Skip to main content

Конференции

Просмотр конференции fido7.cooking:

Предыдущее Следующее

Дата: 30 Aug 2020, 16:03:30
От: Ruth Haffly @ 1:396/45.28
Кому: MICHAEL LOO
Тема: 628 goose is cooked


Hi Michael,

 ML> >  JW> normal cooking methods are designed to reduce the fat: lifting
 ML> the >  JW> skin from the flesh, pre-steaming, pricking the skin with a
 ML> fork, >  JW> roasting on raised drip racks, omitting dressing in the
 ML> cavity and > I never cooked a goose. My mom and dad decided after my
 ML> grandmother

 ML> It's really a bunch of trouble to get it quite
 ML> right. Luckily, being dark meat, it's not bad
 ML> even when it's not done quite right.

I know my dad's mother cooked goose in such a manner that the fat was
let out. Dad told us that his mom used it, instead of Vick's Vap-O-Rub
on him when he'd get a cold.

 ML> > Christmas dinner. (It's traditional in Germany; my ancestry is all
 ML> > German.) Actually, thinking back, they started with goose before
 ML> then

 ML> As I recall, Weihnachtsgans in the old country
 ML> is frequently braised. Makes sense, because that
 ML> requires less attention, and you can just stick
 ML> it in the oven or on the back of the stove, and
 ML> it'll be ready when you come back from church.

It does make sense.

 ML> > but I don't remember exactly, probably after Mom started working and
 ML> > they could afford it.  She always prepared it exactly like turkey
 ML> with > stuffing, but no pre steaming or skin pricking.

 ML> Without pretreatment, a lot of fat gets trapped
 ML> underneath the skin, which can be a good thing or
 ML> a bad thing depending on your attitude towards
 ML> fat. I like the meat well basted; on the other
 ML> hand, crispy skin is nice, too.

I'd rather have crispy skin. Steve found that you can crisp up chicken
or turkey skin in the microwave so it's almost as good as slow rendering
on the stove top. A lot faster and neater than doing it on the stove top
too. (G)


 ML> > While we were in HI, I tried a duck, following an Alton Brown
 ML> recipe. It > was pretty good but we've not seen duck since then. This
 ML> one came with a > packet of "orange sauce" and wild rice; I didn't use
 ML> those that day but > did, a day or so later, and after a couple of
 ML> bites, we didn't finish > the rest of it.

 ML> Maple Leaf Farms (despite the implications of
 ML> its name an Indiana company) pioneered the I think
 ML> sharp practice of including a sauce packet in its
 ML> birds' cavities and getting to charge poultry
 ML> prices for sugar and cornstarch water with a
 ML> little orange concentrate.

As I recall, this had a bitter taste to it. It's one of the few times
we've dumped (otherwise) good food.

 ML> >  JW> so on. But with wild birds, especially spring ones in the north
 ML> the >  JW> opposite is done: larding, barding (wrapping the breasts
 ML> with
 ML> >  JW> bacon), basting with butter and pan juices, rich dressings etc.
 ML> > Give it all the fat you can at that point.

 ML> > James Michener's book "Chesapeake", has a chapter about the goose.
 ML> It's > a fiction book, but he did a lot of research for his books so
 ML> the
 ML> > underlying facts to the story are accurate.

 ML> A fiction book that doesn't have its facts right
 ML> is fantasy or worthless or both.

I'd say more the latter, unless it's intentionally fantasy.

 ML> >  JW>       Title: Pot Roast Geese
 ML> > That's a different thought path; I always associated roasting with
 ML> goose > as the "standard" cooking method.

 ML> There's no real standard, same as there's no
 ML> canonical way of cooking a chicken. It's more
 ML> likely that a cook will look at a bird and say,
 ML> oh, too fat, got to pretreat it and roast it,
 ML> or oh, too skinny, moist heat for this one.
 ML> Also there might be different preferences in
 ML> different regions, as with beef brisket, which
 ML> in England old and New is apt to be corned,
 ML> whereas in New York and continental Europe moist,
 ML> low, and slow is just the ticket, and in Texas
 ML> dry, low, and slow produces the best results.

Pays your money, takes your choice.


 ML> Swan Leg Choucroute
 ML> categories: game, French, American, main

Finding a swan for sale would probably be a bit of a challenge.

---
Catch you later,
Ruth
rchaffly{at}earthlink{dot}net  FIDO 1:396/45.28


... Our necessities are few but our wants are endless...

--- PPoint 3.01
Origin: Sew! That's My Point (1:396/45.28)

Предыдущее Следующее

К списку сообщений
К списку конференций