Skip to main content

Конференции

Просмотр конференции fido7.cooking:

Предыдущее Следующее

Дата: 22 Jan 2021, 12:23:04
От: Dave Drum @ 1:229/452.0
Кому: Bob Roberts
Тема: Meskin Food


-=> Bob Roberts wrote to Dave Drum <=-

 DD> When I lived in the South Bay area of LA (Inglewood, now known I am told
 DD> as "Inglehood") there were a couple favourites in the Mexican restaurant
 DD> category. I learned about Mexican food there. Much as I learned about
 DD> Cantonese food at House of Yee - across from Hollywood Park race track.
 DD> By going through the menu - one dish at a time.

 BR> The best Mexican food is always from those hole-in-the-wall shops.  The
 BR> ones where you walk in and the record scratches and all the locals
 BR> turn around to look at you.  If you can manage to get your order in
 BR> and maybe overlook the dirty floors.... the food is typically
 BR> fantastic!

All the ones I went into in Inglewood and Hawthorne were clean, if worn
a bit. And no joke box. The El Mexico Cafe gave me my first lesson in
"real" Mexican cooking. There was chile on the menu. I *assumed* it was
going to be similar to the chilli I had grown up with in Illinois. Boy!
Howdy! I knew enough Spanish from high school to know the "rojo" meant
read and "verde" meant green. And I thought to myself "red is hot so
green must be medium". That was an education. Their chile verde was very
incendiary.
 
 BR> I don't know Asian food as well as Mexican food.  I didn't start eating
 BR> Chinese very often until I married my wife--- as she loves the stuf.
 BR> I am partial to the Szechuan style.

I like it all - but my favourites all seem to be Cantonese. I also like
Thai and other Southeast Asian cuisines - in their original heats. 
 
 DD> Then I moved back to Illinois where there was a small Mexican place
 DD> called Paula's. Paula had a cook from Cuba so I leared about Latino
 DD> Fusion cooking. Then Paula got a wealthy and influential boy friend
 DD> who did not want her running a "taco stand" (it wasn't) so she shut it
 DD> down. And the only choice for Mexican(ish) food was Taco Gringo - a
 DD> local chain of taco stands. Then Chi-Chi's came to town. I ate there
 DD> one time in the several years that passed before Xochimilco opened its
 DD> doors. Chi Chi's was gone in six months.

 BR> My folks live in the area of Pittsburgh PA.  Several years ago, when I
 BR> went to visit them, I always wanted Mexican food because thats what I
 BR> loved.  However at the time the only Mexican food in the area was
 BR> Chi-Chis (as you mentioned) and the burittos at the local greasy spoon
 BR> bar n' grill.  Chi-Chi's was so bad my dad refused to take me there,
 BR> so we went to the greasy spoon.  Their idea of a buritto was a
 BR> tortilla filled with ground beef, with a can of chili dumped on top.

 BR> Fast forward to today, and the area around Pittsburgh is filled with
 BR> fantastic Mexican resturants and taco shops.  Very good Mexican to be
 BR> had in the area now.  I guess it just took awhile for them to catch
 BR> up.

People will recognise and reward good authentic food. Even if they bend
the rules a bit to their liking. My area goes in cycles. For a long time
there were Chinese places popping up thicker than fast food burger places.
Then it was cheapy steak houses like Western Sizzler and Ponderosa or
Bonanza. Lately it has been authentic Mexican places. But not one of 
them offer one of my favourites - Bistek Rajas. I checked.

MMMMM----- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.06

      Title: Bistec Rajas
 Categories: Beef, Chilies, Herbs, Vegetables
      Yield: 4 servings

      3 tb Olive oil, more to drizzle
           - on steaks
      2    (16 oz ea) New York strips;
           - (1/2 a steak per serving)
      4 tb Adobo; below
      2    Poblano chilies, roasted,
           - peeled, seeded, thin sliced
      1    Jalapeno; roasted, peeled,
            - seeded, thin sliced
      1     White onion; thin sliced
      1 md Shallot; thin sliced
    1/2 c  Nopales; grilled 5 min on
           - each side, sliced
           Epazote Butter; below
           Salt & fresh ground pepper

MMMMM--------------------------ADOBO---------------------------------
    1/4 c  Cumin seeds
    1/4 c  Coriander seeds
    1/4 c  Fennel seeds
    1/4 c  Yellow mustard seeds
      2    Ancho chilies, stemmed,
           - seeded, deveined, torn in
           - small pieces
      2    Pasilla chilies; stemmed,
           - seeded, deveined, torn in
           - small pieces
    1/2 c  Dried whole oregano; (pref
           - Mexican)
    1/4 c  Spanish paprika (pimenton);
           - sweet or hot
      2 tb Garlic powder
      2 tb Onion powder

MMMMM---------------------EPAZOTE BUTTER-----------------------------
        bn Epazote leaves; picked (2 c)
        bn Fresh cilantro; rough chop'd
           - (about 1 cup)
      1 cl Garlic
           Juice of 1 lime
      1 ts (ea) salt & fresh ground
           - pepper
    1/2 lb Butter; softened

  Drizzle a little olive on each steak and sprinkle 1
  tablespoon Adobo on each side of the steaks. Allow to
  rest.

  Meanwhile, using a saute pan over medium heat, add 1 tb
  olive oil, the roasted poblano and jalapeno chilies and
  onion. Cook for 5 minutes, until the onion is
  translucent. Remove and cool.

  Then, in a large saute pan, add the remaining 2 tb olive
  oil and the shallots. Cook softly over medium heat until
  translucent, about 5 minutes. Then add the chile-onion
  mixture and cook for another 5 minutes. Then add the
  nopales. Season with 1 ts salt and 1 ts pepper and set
  aside.

  On a hot grill, cook the steak for 7 to 8 minutes on
  each side until medium-rare and remove from the grill.
  Allow to rest for 5 minutes, then slice in 1" pieces. 

  Divide the chile-onion mixture onto 4 plates and top
  with the sliced steak. Next, top with some Epazote
  Butter, however much you'd like, and put the plate under
  a broiler just for a few seconds, long enough for the 
  butter to melt. 

  Serve and enjoy!

  ADOBO: Heat a dry skillet over medium-low heat. Pour in
  the cumin, coriander, fennel and mustard seeds along
  with the pieces of ancho and pasilla chiles. Toast,
  stirring constantly, until it's very aromatic and just
  begins to smoke, about 3 minutes.

  Dump the mixture onto a plate and let it cool to room
  temperature. Grind it to a fine powder in a spice
  grinder or clean coffee grinder.

  Put the powder in a large bowl and add the oregano,
  paprika, garlic powder and onion powder. Stir them
  really well to combine.

  Store the adobo in an airtight container or resealable
  plastic bag in a cool, dark place for up to a month.

  EPAZOTE BUTTER: In a blender, puree the epazote,
  cilantro, garlic, lime juice, salt and pepper with 1/2
  cup water. Then take herb puree and mix well with
  softened butter until a green butter occurs. Once mixed,
  you can wrap in parchment paper and freeze. It keeps for
  up to a month.

  NOTES: To roast poblano and jalapeno chiles, place them
  directly on the grill or over an open flame until they
  blister and get charred on the outside. Then put them in
  a bag and let them steam up for about 5 minutes until
  they cool down. Once cooled, peel off the skin, remove
  seeds and thin slice.

  Yield: 4 servings

  RECIPE FROM: Isidro Valadaz, chef-owner Nichole's

  Uncle Dirty Dave's Archives

MMMMM

... That must be wonderful!  I don't understand it at all.

--- EzyBlueWave V3.00 01FB001F
Origin: Tiny's BBS - telnet://tinysbbs.com:3023 (1:229/452)

Предыдущее Следующее

К списку сообщений
К списку конференций