Skip to main content

Конференции

Просмотр конференции fido7.cooking:

Предыдущее Следующее

Дата: 23 Jan 2021, 10:59:10
От: Ruth Haffly @ 1:396/45.28
Кому: MICHAEL LOO
Тема: 280 weather and not


Hi Michael,

 ML> >  ML> That must be a local rule, because in a lot of
 ML> >  ML> places it simply doesn't hold. We have people
 ML> >  ML> besides me here who could attest to that.
 ML> > So it may be something he learned growing up outside of Buffalo but
 ML> not > holding true everywhere. Probably something his parents used to
 ML> say that > he picked up on.

 ML> It is true that lower temps generally mean
 ML> lower moisture and thus less snow. That
 ML> doesn't mean "it can't happen here."

True, where I grew up was much less humid than where he did so when the
air was drier in the lower temps, we didn't get the snow. OTOH, where
Steve grew up, the air stayed much more humid--the barge canal was
across the street from his front door. Combined with being about 30
miles south of Lake Ontario, temps didn't get as cold but there was a
lot of lake effect snow.


 ML> To spell things out, the Cooperative Institute
 ML> for Research in Environmental Sciences at the
 ML> University of Colorado Boulder says
 ML>  While it can be too warm to snow, it cannot
 ML>  be too cold to snow. Snow can occur even at
 ML>  incredibly low temperatures as long as there
 ML>  is some source of moisture and some way to
 ML>  lift or cool the air. It is true, however,
 ML>  that most heavy snowfalls occur when there
 ML>  is relatively warm air near the ground -
 ML>  typically -9 degrees Celsius (15 degrees
 ML>  Fahrenheit) or warmer - since warmer air
 ML>  can hold more water vapor.


Which is probably how the "too cold to snow" actually meant "too dry to
snow'.

 ML> >  ML> > Just goes to show that all kinds of people can succeed in all
 ML> kinds >  ML> of > fields.
 ML> >  ML> Well, some kinds at least.
 ML> > True; I wouldn't succeed in music or a technical field but would in
 ML> a > language arts or creative arts field.

 ML> We all have our strengths and weaknesses:
 ML> sometimes it's interesting to fight the
 ML> weaknesses, sometimes to give in to them.
 ML> Most of the time ignore them of course.

True, we're encouraged (thru standardised tests, other evaluations in
grade school) to take a track that best fits our so called strengths.
Also parental influence to the courses we take--I had a friend who
really wanted to be a nurse but her aunt (Both parents had died so she
lived with her aunt.) pushed her into taking a secretarial path. She
did, don't know if she ever did switch to nursing or not. OTOH, my
parents insisted on straight college entrance courses; I did that, not
so great in some subjects but well enough to go on. College is where I
had, enjoyed, and did well in the art courses.

 ML> >  ML> Now, Bonnie's son uses the new generation, whose
 ML> >  ML> name I reported but can't remember, as a frequent
 ML> >  ML> meal replacement, and he's pretty exacting.
 ML> > Isn't he the one that has to be exacting on his diet, waiting for a

 ML> That's the one. He's in the hospital with
 ML> pneumonia now, and I can't get back east
 ML> to see him.

Sounds rough, hopefully he will pull thru and get the transplant soon.


 ML> > transplant? My parents usually went for inexpensive but filling
 ML> foods as > they were raising 5 kids on a not that great salary. Mom
 ML> had started
 ML> > working for the school a couple of years before but the way they fed
 ML> us > didn't really change a lot.

 ML> Instant Breakfast then would have been a
 ML> quixotic choice, speaking of which, because
 ML> it was never a thrifty item and not (as you
 ML> found out) particularly filling. Maybe they
 ML> thought it would more like a milk shake and
 ML> thus sort of a treat for you.

I think the latter was what was in their line of thinking. They probably
thought that one or two boxes of Instant Breakfast plus a gallon of milk
were just as reasonable as sandwiches for us. We'd have had the milk
anyway so the cost was Instant Breakfast or bread plus whatever filling.

 ML> >  ML> >  ML> I make a pilafy or Spanishy rice dish I'll
 ML> >  ML> >  ML> saute the grain quite hard, and the kernels
 ML> >  ML> >  ML> will fracture, allowing water to get in the
 ML> >  ML> >  ML> fissures, producing a similar effect, both soft
 ML> >  ML> >  ML> and, er, crinkly, at the same time.
 ML> >  ML> > Not crunchy?
 ML> >  ML> Not at all. Crinkly - it's a feel on the
 ML> >  ML> tongue more than on the teeth.
 ML> > An interesting concept.

 ML> I do try to choose my words with reasonable
 ML> care most of the time.

It helps. (G)


---
Catch you later,
Ruth
rchaffly{at}earthlink{dot}net  FIDO 1:396/45.28


... If you think you are confused now, wait until I explain it!

--- PPoint 3.01
Origin: Sew! That's My Point (1:396/45.28)

Предыдущее Следующее

К списку сообщений
К списку конференций